This article was written by guest author Gustavo Osna, member of the Nucleus of Civil Procedural Comparative Law (UFPR), attorney, and professor of graduate and specialized courses at Federal University of Paraná State in Brazil. This is part of a series of opinion articles that were originally published in Última Instância in Brazil. The original Portuguese version can be found below.

 

When defining the main characteristics of contemporary society, you have to consider its high capacity for spreading of information. In this game, in which access to social networks usually deals the cards, the speed of circulation assumes levels previously unimaginable. It forms a new context, with which questions like management of epidemics also took on unheard of forms – save for the dangers incurred in unnecessary boasting, and save for the construction of a powerful tool of awareness.

The question certainly poses challenges to the operator of the Law. In this brief essay, we raise one of them: the possibility that some individual rights affect epidemic pathology, by being adequately owned, they recommend a collectivized analysis, so that, in short, they are known as “homogeneous individuals.”

To comprehend this proposal, it’s worth remembering that “individual homogeneous rights” are nothing more than individual rights that for questions of effectiveness give rise to their procedural grouping[2]. The inspiration in the American class action, partially taken over by our micro-system of collective process, sees striking colors to this painting[3]. Briefly said, it deals with opting for agglutinated analysis of something that (hypothetically) could be taken to justice at an individual level.

It is precisely in this field that the current note places itself. After all, considering the argumentative arsenal that customarily marks legal debate in times of epidemic, in this situation this re-sizing of looks can also be recommended. In synthesis, at the time in which a threat reaches a plurality of individuals, it is fitting that it also creates opportunities for a multiplicity of related disputes. And, with this backdrop, the dispersed analysis flirts with grave and undesirable risks.

Visualizing this image more clearly, we take a hypothetical example: let us suppose that throughout the next month a disease with high transmission potential, protectable by means of imported vaccines, ends up spreading throughout the southern region of Brazil.  In the current context, it wouldn’t be long for the news to spread through the entire national territory, causing fear and making it so that each individual would pursue their own protection.

In this example, it would be probable for numerous individual demands of obtaining the vaccine. In a defense perspective, it would even be predictable that the Public Authorities would stimulate the incidence of the barrier of “possible reserve”. In the end, it wouldn’t be surprising that the different decisions were unwillingly rendered in analogous situations, making subjects under the same condition receive many responses for no reason.

Therefore, this question would change shape at the moment, risks of pulverization would be perceived, the series of individual interests collectivized in a single process (creating, also, only one decision). In this new scenario, the complexity related to them would be effectively observed, emptying simplistic arguments or positions. All at once: (i) themes like the scarcity of resources would be debated with due seriousness, comprehending the global dimension of the problem[4]; and (ii) the entire series of individual interests called into question, the legal decision would own them in a proportional and adequate manner. Techniques such as structural sentences would gain special importance, noting that not always the binomial choice between the “consequential” and the “inconsequential” would be the best alternative [5].

It’s interesting to perceive that this ample and more sophisticated rationality is even unprecedented in our planning. On the contrary, it is exactly this that the foundation supports, mutatis mutandis, the so-called “universal judgment of failure” – reuniting the series of competing credits and imposing that their discharge attends the criteria and parameters of reasonableness[6]. The risk of analysis parallel to individual pretensions made it so that the hunt for reminiscent credit was excluded creating a route for equalization of gains and losses.  And, in our vision, the adoption of a similar way could also produce better results in certain situations related to the treatment and the prevention of epidemic disease.

However, transposing the theoretical framework for our reality, you see that its effective application is limited.  This is as much because of obstacles of a procedural nature as obstacles of an ideological slant[7]. The fierce defense of an individualistic content of procedural guarantees and distrust regarding the role of the magistrate takes the lead, leading to a conclusion: in current Brazilian law, the agglutinated analysis is still hardly valued. This limitation makes it so that, in the case of an epidemic, there is a clear stimulation for dispersed questioning of the issue. A “race” for guardianship is created, in the situation of there being a scarcity of resources; the bitter flavor of insufficiency is experimented only by those who arrive in last place.

[2]     When analyzing the situation in greater detail, refer to OSNA, Gustavo. Direitos Individuais Homogêneos: pressupostos, fundamentos e aplicação no processo civil. São Paulo: Ed. RT, 2014. See, also, ARENHART, Sérgio Cruz. The collective ownership of individual interests: for beyond the protection of homogeneous individual intrests. São Paulo: Ed. RT, 2013. ZAVASCKI, Teori Albino. Collective Process – Ownership of collective rights and collective ownership of rights. São Paulo Revista dos Tribunais, 2006.

[3]     Same. Still analyzing the problem in Brazilian doctrine, GIDI, Antonio. A Class Action como instrumento de tutela coletiva de direitos. São Paulo: Ed. RT, 2007. GRINOVER, Ada Pellegrini; WATANABE, Kazuo; MULLENIX, Linda. Os processos coletivos nos países de civil Law e common Law: uma análise de direito comparado. 2 ed. São Paulo: Ed. RT, 2011. MENDES, Aluisio Gonçalves de Castro. Ações Coletivas no Direito Comparado e Nacional. 2 ed. São Paulo Ed. RT., 2009. ROQUE, André Vasconcelos. Class Action – Ações Coletivas nos Estados Unidos: o que podemos aprender com eles?. Salvador: Ed. JusPodivm, 2013.

[4]     Example, AMARAL, Gustavo. Direito, escassez e escolha. Rio de Janeiro: Renovar, 2001.Also, HOLMES, Stephen. SUNSTEIN, Cass R. The Cost of Rights – Why Liberty Depends on Taxes. New York: W.W Norton & Company, 2000.

[5]     Regarding this theme, ARENHART, Sérgio Cruz. Decisões estruturais no direito processual civil brasileiro. In. Revista de Processo. v. 225. São Paulo: Ed. RT, 2013. Also, VIOLIN, Jordão. Protagonismo Judiciário e Processo Coletivo Estrutural. Salvador: Ed. JusPodivm, 2013.

[6]     See Law 11.101/2005, Art. 76 and Art. 83.

[7]     Thus, passim, OSNA, Gustavo. Ob. cit.

Founded in 2004, Última Instância is the largest source of information on Law and Justice in Portuguese and one of the most traditional and specialized websites of Brazil. Its area of expertise, since its foundation, is the coverage of the judiciary sector and the great legal issues in Brazil. The portal publishes daily news, articles and columns on law, legislation and state. It is also meant to  be a space where students and professionals can find inputs and data for their everyday reflections and studies regarding the legal practice.

—————————————————–

Ao definir as principais características da sociedade contemporânea, não se pode deixar de lado a sua alta capacidade de dispersão de informações. Nesse jogo, em que o acesso a redes sociais costuma dar as cartas, a velocidade de circulação assume patamares antes inimagináveis. Forma-se um novo contexto, fazendo com que questões como a gestão de epidemias também assumam contornos inéditos – ora pelos perigos de que se incorra em alarde desnecessário, ora por se construir uma poderosa ferramenta de conscientização.

A questão certamente impõe desafios ao operador do Direito. Nesse breve ensaio, suscitamos um deles: a possibilidade de que alguns direitos individuais afetos à patologia epidêmica, para serem adequadamente tutelados, recomendem uma análise coletivizada; de que sejam, enfim, entendidos como “individuais homogêneos”.

Para compreender essa proposta, vale lembrar que os “direitos individuais homogêneos” nada mais são do que direitos individuais que, por questões de efetividade, sugerem seu agrupamento processual[1]. A inspiração na class action estadunidense, parcialmente encampada pelo nosso microssistema de processo coletivo, confere cores marcantes a essa pintura[2]. Resumidamente, trata-se de optar pela análise aglutinada de algo que (hipoteticamente) poderia ser levado ao Judiciário em sede individual.

É precisamente nesse campo que a atual nota se coloca. Afinal, considerando o arsenal argumentativo que costuma marcar o debate jurídico em tempos de epidemias, também aqui esse redimensionamento de olhares pode ser recomendado. Em síntese, no momento em que a ameaça atinge uma pluralidade de indivíduos, é cabível que também enseje uma multiplicidade de litígios afins. E, com esse pano de fundo, a análise pulverizada flerta com riscos graves e indesejáveis.

Visualizando mais claramente essa imagem, tomemos um exemplo hipotético: suponhamos que ao longo do próximo mês uma doença com alto potencial transmissivo, passível de proteção por meio de vacinas importadas, passasse a se alastrar pela região sul do Brasil. No atual contexto, não tardaria para que a notícia se espalhasse por todo o território nacional, causando temor e fazendo com que cada indivíduo perseguisse sua própria proteção.

Nesse quadro, seria provável que inúmeras demandas individuais fossem propostas com vistas à obtenção da vacina. Em contestação, seria ainda previsível que o Poder Público viesse a suscitar a incidência da barreira da “reserva do possível”. Por fim, não surpreenderia que decisões discrepantes fossem imotivadamente proferidas em situações análogas, fazendo com que sujeitos na mesma condição recebessem respostas diversas sem qualquer razão.

Entretanto, essa questão mudaria de figura no momento em que, percebidos os riscos da pulverização, a série de interesses individuais fosse coletivizada em um só processo (gerando, também, somente uma decisão). Nesse novo cenário, a complexidade relacionada ao tema seria efetivamente observada, esvaziando argumentos ou posicionamentos simplistas. A um só tempo: (i) temas como a escassez de recursos poderiam ser debatidos com a devida seriedade, compreendendo a dimensão global do problema[3]; e (ii) colocada em pauta toda a série de interesses individuais, a decisão judicial poderia tutelá-los de maneira mais proporcional e adequada. Técnicas como as sentenças estruturais ganhariam especial importância, constatando-se que nem sempre a escolha binomial entre “procedente” e “improcedente” seria a melhor alternativa[4].

É interessante perceber que essa racionalidade ampla e mais sofisticada sequer é inédita em nosso ordenamento. Pelo contrário, é exatamente esse o alicerce que embasa, mutatis mutandis, o chamado “juízo universal da falência” – reunindo a série de créditos concorrentes e impondo que sua quitação atenda a critérios e parâmetros de razoabilidade[5]. O risco da análise paralela das pretensões individuais fez com que se vedasse a caça ao crédito remanescente, criando uma via de equalização dos ganhos e das perdas. E, em nossa visão, a adoção de um caminho similar também poderia produzir melhores resultados em determinadas situações relacionadas ao tratamento e à prevenção de doenças epidêmicas.

Contudo, transpondo o arcabouço teórico para a nossa realidade, vê-se que sua aplicação efetiva ainda é limitada. Isso se dá tanto por óbices de natureza procedimental quanto por entraves de cunho ideológico[6]. A defesa ferrenha de um conteúdo individualista das garantias processuais e a desconfiança quanto ao papel do magistrado assumem a dianteira, conduzindo a uma conclusão: no atual direito brasileiro, a análise aglutinada ainda é pouco valorizada. Essa limitação faz com que, em casos de epidemia, haja um claro estímulo para o questionamento pulverizado da questão. Cria-se uma “corrida” pela tutela, fazendo com que, havendo escassez de recursos, o sabor amargo da insuficiência seja experimentado apenas por aqueles que chegam nas últimas posições.

[2]     Idem. Ainda, analisando o problema na doutrina brasileira, GIDI, Antonio. A Class Action como instrumento de tutela coletiva de direitos. São Paulo: Ed. RT, 2007. GRINOVER, Ada Pellegrini; WATANABE, Kazuo; MULLENIX, Linda. Os processos coletivos nos países de civil Law e common Law: uma análise de direito comparado. 2 ed. São Paulo: Ed. RT, 2011. MENDES, Aluisio Gonçalves de Castro. Ações Coletivas no Direito Comparado e Nacional. 2 ed. São Paulo: Ed. RT., 2009. ROQUE, André Vasconcelos. Class Action – Ações Coletivas nos Estados Unidos: o que podemos aprender com eles?. Salvador: Ed. JusPodivm, 2013.

[3]     Assim, AMARAL, Gustavo. Direito, escassez e escolha. Rio de Janeiro: Renovar, 2001.Também, HOLMES, Stephen. SUNSTEIN, Cass R. The Cost of Rights – Why Liberty Depends on Taxes.New York: W.W Norton &Company, 2000.

[4]     Sobre o tema, ARENHART, Sérgio Cruz. Decisões estruturais no direito processual civil brasileiro. In. Revista de Processo. v. 225. São Paulo: Ed. RT, 2013. Também,VIOLIN, Jordão. Protagonismo Judiciário e Processo Coletivo Estrutural. Salvador: Ed.JusPodivm, 2013.

[5]     Vide Lei 11.101/2005, art. 76 e art. 83.

[6]     Desse modo, passim, OSNA, Gustavo. Ob. cit.